Untitled

Aug 22

mystiquemonique said: hello, do ants have dicks? i need to know asap

nanodash:

You know what…I didn’t know, so I went to look it up and I don’t think Wikipedia is aware of the comedy goldmine that is ant mating. Strap in, cursing probable definite.

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So ants have queen ants. The lady ant all the other ants want to get with. The Natalie Dormer of the ant world. Queenie lays eggs. If they’re fertilised, they become males, if not, females. If they’re not that well fed, the females become worker ants and if they’re well fed, they become queens. Then the fucking awful day begins.

As the pupate to grow their wings, the males are, and I quote the greatest sentence on wikipedia: “quickly converted into single-purpose sexual missiles" Just like humans in a nightclub. What the fuck nature?

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The males and the virgin queens sprout wings because ants aren’t annoying enough and take flight to do the aerial bouncy-bouncy. It’s called the nuptial flight.

The males are idiots. Super idiots. As in they can’t feed themselves, they’re just programmed to mate and do it, so to answer your question (you asked for this) I again quote: ”the male literally explodes his internal genitalia into the genital chamber of the queen and quickly dies.” So no, they just have claspy type things to grip onto the female. What the fuck, nature?

The new queens then fly off and start a new colony, using what the male gave them whenever they decide they want a new male ant. Ah, the miracle of life.

That was an interesting way to procrastinate. With ant sex.

awwww-cute:

The Philadelphia Zoo released pictures of their Black-Footed Cat kittens getting a checkup, and sweet lord are these things cute

awwww-cute:

The Philadelphia Zoo released pictures of their Black-Footed Cat kittens getting a checkup, and sweet lord are these things cute

(via tumorsandmusic)

(Source: thedisneyseries, via rose-colored-looking-glass)

Aug 21

The point of the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge

the point of pouring a shit ton of ice water over yourself is because when one suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) one of the effects the disease has is a numbness throughout the body, as well as struggling to breathe, and both these are meant to temporarily happen when doused in freezing water. It’s to raise awareness of what ALS feels like and encourage donations towards research and cures.

(Source: aristoxxcracy, via kingsleyyy)

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charizard:

joshunf:

if a charmander running in circles chasing its tail doesnt fit your blog then you are running the wrong kind of blog

god i hate when people leak my baby pictures

charizard:

joshunf:

if a charmander running in circles chasing its tail doesnt fit your blog then you are running the wrong kind of blog

god i hate when people leak my baby pictures

(Source: precumming, via rose-colored-looking-glass)

(Source: media-cache-ec0.pinimg.com, via realmonstrosities)

bl-ossomed:

play-the-game:

bl-ossomed:

oaktreegirl:

I scrolled past this at first and then I thought about it and I realized what it means

what does it mean?

It means do you need someone for the sake of not feeling alone and or sad or do you want me because you actually love me, not solely on comfort and fear but you actually want me.

Thank you ^^^^

bl-ossomed:

play-the-game:

bl-ossomed:

oaktreegirl:

I scrolled past this at first and then I thought about it and I realized what it means

what does it mean?

It means do you need someone for the sake of not feeling alone and or sad or do you want me because you actually love me, not solely on comfort and fear but you actually want me.

Thank you ^^^^

(Source: hqlines, via the-house-rules-sammy)

alohasophh:

sixpenceee:

In high school I took a lot of social science classes. It was interesting, but all the politics and the roaring debates in classroom was a major turn off. Don’t get me wrong. I recognize it’s important. But to me, it was a whirling pool of anger and resentment.
That’s not the major reason I chose to be a science major, but it’s a contributing factor. I thought science was all factual information. People in lab coats striving to better understand our world. To me that was beautiful and I wanted to be a part of it. Burning people at stake for a different viewpoint was centuries ago… right? 
Wrong. Science is just as susceptible to that “whirlpool of anger and resentment” as anything else. Even if something has been proven with impeccable data and results, it does not guarantee acceptance with open arms.
Take Dr.Bruce Lipton for example. We now take epigenetics seriously. But in the 1990’s when the topic was first introduced, scientists blew up into hysterics at the thought of the concept. This is why Dr.Lipton left the academia for good in 1992, because although his experiments supported his views, he felt his message was falling onto deaf ears.
An interesting book, I’m reading called The Mind (edited by John Brockman) also highlights an example. When Darwin came back from his voyage, he displayed his Galapagos finches and reptiles, the crucial evidence of evolution. John Gould who was a great ornithologist at the time and knew a lot about birds, corrected some of Darwin’s information and gave him more crucial information in support of evolution. 
But Gould himself still remained a creationist and didn’t stand for evolution. As the book says "the man who knew more saw less and the man who knew less saw more"
I learned that great things take time. Facts and statistics don’t persuade people. Some are forever imprisoned by their own beliefs.
Here is a great article on how some people respond to scientific evidence by twisting information to fit their preexisting views (LINK)
Ofcourse science is a ever changing field and I’m sure by the time I’m 40, science textbooks will be revised and edited many times over. But many new concepts are heavily ridiculed and then gradually accepted generations later. 
"A new scientific truth does not triumph by convincing its opponents and making them see the light, but rather because its opponents eventually die and a new generation grows up that is familiar with it."
-Max Planck

I aspire to be you.

alohasophh:

sixpenceee:

In high school I took a lot of social science classes. It was interesting, but all the politics and the roaring debates in classroom was a major turn off. Don’t get me wrong. I recognize it’s important. But to me, it was a whirling pool of anger and resentment.

That’s not the major reason I chose to be a science major, but it’s a contributing factor. I thought science was all factual information. People in lab coats striving to better understand our world. To me that was beautiful and I wanted to be a part of it. Burning people at stake for a different viewpoint was centuries ago… right? 

Wrong. Science is just as susceptible to that “whirlpool of anger and resentment” as anything else. Even if something has been proven with impeccable data and results, it does not guarantee acceptance with open arms.

Take Dr.Bruce Lipton for example. We now take epigenetics seriously. But in the 1990’s when the topic was first introduced, scientists blew up into hysterics at the thought of the concept. This is why Dr.Lipton left the academia for good in 1992, because although his experiments supported his views, he felt his message was falling onto deaf ears.

An interesting book, I’m reading called The Mind (edited by John Brockman) also highlights an example. When Darwin came back from his voyage, he displayed his Galapagos finches and reptiles, the crucial evidence of evolution. John Gould who was a great ornithologist at the time and knew a lot about birds, corrected some of Darwin’s information and gave him more crucial information in support of evolution. 

But Gould himself still remained a creationist and didn’t stand for evolution. As the book says "the man who knew more saw less and the man who knew less saw more"

I learned that great things take time. Facts and statistics don’t persuade people. Some are forever imprisoned by their own beliefs.

Here is a great article on how some people respond to scientific evidence by twisting information to fit their preexisting views (LINK)

Ofcourse science is a ever changing field and I’m sure by the time I’m 40, science textbooks will be revised and edited many times over. But many new concepts are heavily ridiculed and then gradually accepted generations later. 

"A new scientific truth does not triumph by convincing its opponents and making them see the light, but rather because its opponents eventually die and a new generation grows up that is familiar with it."

-Max Planck

I aspire to be you.

(via sixpenceee)

sensxal-bliss:

sensxal-bliss:

(via rose-colored-looking-glass)

lazylunatic:

a-spoon-is-born:

trapbuddha:

adumbrant:

nirvanatrill:

Albert Einstein teaching a physics class at Lincoln university (HCBU in Pennsylvania) in 1946

Sure as hell never mention that about him.

HOMIE

His anti-racism views and work are often totally ignored by historians.

lazylunatic:

a-spoon-is-born:

trapbuddha:

adumbrant:

nirvanatrill:

Albert Einstein teaching a physics class at Lincoln university (HCBU in Pennsylvania) in 1946

Sure as hell never mention that about him.

HOMIE

His anti-racism views and work are often totally ignored by historians.

(via rose-colored-looking-glass)

(Source: punktion, via princessofthewallflowers)

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